39 Books provided to show clearly two themes important for mankind

The Divine Creator of heaven and earth wished not to leave the ones sent out of the Garden of Eden on their own. Though Adam and Eve rebelled against God, Him having expelled them, the Elohim was willing to stay close to them and to help there where He could or where it was appropriate to help them. Like any wise parent God did not want to spoil man and wanted them to learn the matters of life. To help them going through the struggles of life after a while God gave mankind His Words or Sayings, beginning with the 10 Sayings, or ten commandments, so they could follow them.

Last weekend (6 and 7 Adar) we celebrated ‘Matan Torah‘, that giving of Torah and Moses having written down God’s Words for us, making it possible up to today to read what had happened in the past, and see how the relation between God and man became defiled but also how it can be restored again.

Moses was the first who got the honour to write down the Words of God and recalling the history of God His People. After him God asked also other men to write down His Will and His advice. After some centuries the world got 17 history books where we may find how God made his ways to Moses and His acts unto the children of Israel (Psalm 103:7). After 5 books of poetry, God revealed His Will and what He was planning to do with man. Ten books concentrate on the prophecies and the promises God made recognisable for mankind.

Already in the 39 books God provided for His Chosen people, man received guidance and enough information to know what God has in store for the earth and how we can share in His glorious purpose. Those 39 books form the Hebrew Bible, or the book of the First or Old Covenant, the Mosaic Covenant notated in the Judaic Books, Kethuvim Aleph by many better known as the Old Testament. It is followed up by the books of the New Covenant, the haBrit haDasha / Kethuvim Beth or Messianic Writings or Messianic Scriptures, better known by man as the New Testament.

The twin themes of both Old and New Testaments are:

  1. the Kingdom of God
  2. the solution against the curse of death, the Messiah, Christ Jesus

In the next series of this site we shall show that there is a good reason to call this site “Messiah for all” and how this Messiah was already announced from the beginning of times. I shall try to show you that in the ancient writings enough indication was given to come to know who that Messiah might be and what his role would be for mankind.

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Everett Fox

For the series showing the prophesies around the Messiah I shall use the bible translation of the American scholar and translator of the Hebrew Bible Everett Fox, who holds the Allen M. Glick Chair in Judaic and Biblical Studies at Clark University in Worcester Massachusetts. His Schocken bible is heavily influenced by the principles of the German religious philosophers Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig. They started their translation of the Hebrew Bible into German in the mid-twenties and Buber finished it in to 1961 to have it published in 1962. Fox found that translation an unique translation, which tries to hew close to the rhythm and forms of the Hebrew text. He attempted an English translation of Genesis in a similar vein. Over the years, it grew — from a text-only publication in Response magazine to a volume of introduction, text, notes, and commentary, and finally, in 1995, to the publication of The Five Books of Moses by the publishing company of Salman Schocken in New York City, Schocken Verlag (Schocken Books).

The Five Books of Moses, translated by Everett Fox, based on the Buber-Rosenzweig translation of the Hebrew Bible.

Fox co-translated Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig their Scripture and Translation into English with Lawrence Rosenwald of Wellesley College (Weissbort and Eysteinsson 562), and presented a new rendering of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, demonstrating the living character of scripture in the modern world.

The guiding principle behind Fox’s translation is that the Hebrew Bible, like much of ancient literature, was meant to be read aloud. Many passages and sections are understandable in depth only when they are analyzed as they are heard. Thus, by preserving such devices as repetition, allusion, alliteration and wordplay, by mimicking the rhythm and the sound structure of the original text, Fox’s translation echoes the Hebrew, conveying ideas and meanings in a manner that vocabulary alone cannot do. His translation is accompanied by extensive commentary and illuminating notes.

 

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Additional reading

  1. Adar 6, Matan Torah remembering the giving of Torah
  2. Struggles of life

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